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The Flavor Bible: The Essential Guide to Culinary Creativity, Based on the Wisdom of America’s Most Imaginative Chefs

Great cooking goes beyond following a recipe–it’s knowing how to season ingredients to coax the greatest possible flavor from them. Drawing on dozens of leading chefs’ combined experience in top restaurants across the country, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg present the definitive guide to creating “deliciousness” in any dish. Thousands of ingredient entries, organized alphabetically

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Great cooking goes beyond following a recipe–it’s knowing how to season ingredients to coax the greatest possible flavor from them. Drawing on dozens of leading chefs’ combined experience in top restaurants across the country, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg present the definitive guide to creating “deliciousness” in any dish.

Thousands of ingredient entries, organized alphabetically and cross-referenced, provide a treasure trove of spectacular flavor combinations. Readers will learn to work more intuitively and effectively with ingredients; experiment with temperature and texture; excite the nose and palate with herbs, spices, and other seasonings; and balance the sensual, emotional, and spiritual elements of an extraordinary meal. Seasoned with tips, anecdotes, and signature dishes from America’s most imaginative chefs, The Flavor Bible is an essential┬áreference for every kitchen.

Winner of the 2009 James Beard Book Award for Best Book: Reference and Scholarship

Comments

BJ says:

An extraordinary book! I recently added this book to my cookbook collection, which numbers more than 1,000 volumes (probably more like 1200 but I’m still cataloging). It has immediately become one of my favorites (and definitely my #1 favorite in English). If you are a serious cook, love to read cookbooks like novels, and view recipes as suggestions rather than as requiring strict adherence to precise measurements, then this is the book for you! (Did I say I LOVE this book?)I make all of the desserts for my husband’s restaurant. If I snag some particularly luscious fruit and want to make it into a dessert, this is the book I reach for first. I don’t WANT to be told how to make a fruit sorbet. I already know how. But I love having a list of suggested flavors and products that go with what I already have. It’s like having an uber-creative friend at your side saying “hey, why not try THIS?”And if you are not an experienced cook, this book provides invaluable guidance that a…

Miemi says:

Amazing Answer to a Prayer Bought this book w/o a whole lot of information about it. Can’t believe it — I now have the resource I’ve been looking for –I’m a cook with some years of experience, a huge cookbook collection, a list of classes taught by renowned experts and cookbook writers, and still I yearned for a reference that gave me the info on what goes with what (w/o me researching my whole library or classnotes. I guess I need “permissions” and this book gave it to me.Tonight I made redfish (snapper in the book) with a crust of almonds, chives, parsley and dill (methodology learned in all those classes). Served w a favorite zuchinni recipe that included the “go-to” ingredients for snapper, and roasted potatoes with light sprinkling of rosemary and salt (again, a “go-to” herb for the main dish).It wasn’t overkill (my worry) — it just plain worked and I did it w/o a single recipe. Cut my cooking time in half and raised my personal culinary “thermometer” by a ton of…

Christopher Hernandez "Chef Tuggie" says:

Flavor, because you can’t live on Bread and Water alone Flavor is the basis for all food, without it, the world would seem less colorful, lifeless, and bland. Food isn’t just about what you can taste in your mouth but also what you can see with your eyes, what you smell with your nose and what you feel in your heart. That’s what is presented in this book. (The authors wrote two other acclaimed books, and .)Culinary Artistry showcased was that food can be art. That colors structure on a plate can evoke emotions the same as any other art work. And like any art work, is in the eye of the beholder.What to Drink with What You Eat gave us the understanding that beverages (not just wine) can be paired and should be thought of as a condiment rather than an afterthoughtThe Flavor Bible talks about, well, flavor; but more…

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